Kerry Mangold (33)

////Kerry Mangold (33)

2019 Mail & Guardian 200 Young South Africans

Health

Kerry Mangold (33)

Kerry Mangold (33)

Technical Lead: HIV Prevention Services


I believe in a public health, gendered and human rights approach to HIV/Aids and I stand up for the rights of all people – especially those who are stigmatised, marginalised and moralised by our society

Technical lead for HIV prevention in the South African National Aids Council Trust (Sanac), Kerry Mangold is passionate about leading and responding in a multi-sectoral way to the plight of HIV/Aids in South Africa.

“I recognise the importance of engaging youth in co-creating a fresh response to their epidemic – where youth account for one third of all new HIV/Aids infections in the country. I know that unless we really listen to our communities and address the multifaceted lives of people vulnerable to, and living with HIV/Aids, we will not achieve the public health goals of the country.”

Sanac is a voluntary association of institutions established by the national Cabinet of the South African Government to unite government, civil society and other national stakeholders in their response to HIV/Aids, tuberculosis (TB) and sexually transmitted infections (STIs). She represents Sanac on the topic of HIV/Aids prevention on various national advisory boards, expert think tanks and technical bodies, representing the country at regional and global meetings on HIV prevention, and in 2018 was the driving force in the development of SANAC’s oral submission on the decriminalisation of sex work to the Parliamentary multi-party women’s caucus. She led the consultative development of the ground-breaking South African national sex worker HIV plan.

Mangold contributed significantly to the National strategic plan for HIV/Aids, TB and STIs, particularly on the issues of prevention, social and structural drivers, and key and vulnerable populations, proposing a prevention roadmap for the country. She continues to work with a team reporting globally on the country’s progress in the Prevention revolution.

With an academic background in business, science and arts, along with her experience and exposure in the public health space from field research conducted, mentoring and playing the role of technical lead have allowed her unique insights into the public health sphere.

“We are not (yet) on track to end the HIV/Aids epidemic by 2030 and it is time that space is provided for young women leaders with fresh perspective to take the reins,” she says, reinforcing her conviction that she is well-placed to tackle this challenge.

“I believe in a public health, gendered and human rights approach to HIV/Aids and I stand up for the rights of all people – especially those who are stigmatised, marginalised and moralised by our society.” – Cayleigh Bright

Twitter: @kerry_mangold